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February 2012 Archives

February 1, 2012

"Google, Facebook, and Your Privacy"

"Google, Facebook, and Your Privacy"

Marc Rotenberg,
EPIC Executive Director

On Point with Tom Ashbrook
WBUR - Boston
February 1, 2012

EPIC Calls for Moratorium on Facial Recognition Technology

In detailed comments to the Federal Trade Commission, EPIC today recommended the suspension of facial recognition technology deployment until adequate safeguards and privacy standards are established. EPIC said that facial recognition is often used by strangers to determine a person's actual identity and that this poses a risk to privacy and personal security. EPIC also noted that some companies have adopted techniques that are more favorable to privacy as they allow users to control the image database while others undermine privacy, as the image database is centrally maintained. EPIC previously submitted a complaint to the FTC about Facebook's use of facial recognition technology to build a secret database of users' biometric data and allowing the company to automatically tag users in photos. The comments follow an FTC workshop exploring the privacy and security issues raised of facial recognition technology. For more information, see EPIC: Federal Trade Commission, EPIC: Face Recognition, and EPIC: Facebook and Face Recognition.

EPIC Seeks Public Release of Google's Privacy Report

EPIC has filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the Federal Trade Commission for the Privacy Report that Google was recently required to submit to the agency. The Commission had previously investigated Google after EPIC filed a complaint regarding Google's Buzz product, which transformed private user contacts into publicly available social network data. Last fall the Commission reached a settlement with Google and, as a result, the company is subject to a consent order that requires it to file regular reports with the Commission. EPIC has requested that Google's first report, filed on January 26, 2012, be released to the public. Because of Google's plan to change its business practice on March 1, 2012, EPIC has asked the FTC to expedite the disclosure of the report. For more information see EPIC: In re Google Buzz.

February 3, 2012

Google Policy Change Triggers EU Privacy Revolt

Leading privacy officials in Europe have asked Google "for a pause" in the company's planned consolidation of user data "in the interests of ensuring that there can be no misunderstanding about Google's commitments to the information rights of their users and EU citizens. . ." EU Commissioner Vivian Reding (@VivianeRedingEU) has expressed support, tweeting "Good that Europe's data protection authorities are ensuring @Google's new privacy policy complies with EU law." EPIC has urged the United States to begin the process of ratification of Council of Europe Privacy Convention, which would establish global standards for privacy protection.

Google Backs Off Privacy Policy Change for Federal Government

In response to growing concern about the impact of Google's proposed policy change on user privacy and cloud-computing services, the company said that its planned privacy changes will not apply to US federal agencies. A report from Safegov.org "Google’s New Privacy Policy Is Unacceptable and Jeopardizes Government Information in the Cloud" recommended that "Google immediately suspend the application of its new privacy policy to Google Apps For Government users." Google told POLITICO's Morning Tech "cloud contracts are crafted with 'narrow, specific obligations' on how data can be used and stored. And those data requirements in the cloud contracts trump the company's standard privacy policy."

February 6, 2012

Congress to Hold Hearing on Department of Homeland Security Social Network Monitoring

On February 16, 2012, the House Committee on Homeland Security will hold a hearing on "DHS Monitoring of Social Networking and Media: Enhancing Intelligence Gathering and Ensuring Privacy." The hearing was called after EPIC obtained nearly 300 pages of documents, as a result of a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit, detailing the Department of Homeland Security's monitoring of social networks and media organizations. The documents included guidelines from DHS instructing General Dynamics to monitor for media reports that "reflect adversely" on the agency or the federal government. For more information see: EPIC v. Department of Homeland Security: Media Monitoring.

February 8, 2012

EPIC Sues Federal Trade Commission to Enforce Google Consent Order

EPIC today filed a Complaint and a Motion for Temporary Restraining Order and Preliminary Injunction in Federal District Court in Washington, DC. EPIC is seeking to compel the Federal Trade Commission to act prior to March 1, when Google plans to make changes in its terms of service that will make it possible for the company to combine user data without user consent. EPIC alleges that this change in business practice is in clear violation of the consent order that Google entered into on October 13, 2011. The consent order arises from a complaint that EPIC brought to the Commission in February, 2010 concerning Google Buzz and a similar attempt by Google to combine user data without user consent. For more information, see EPIC - In re Google Buzz, FTC - "FTC Charges Deceptive Privacy Practices in Google's Rollout of Its Buzz Social Network."

FAA Legislation Prompts Agency to Assess Safety of Drones in US Airspace

In the Re-Authorization Bill for the Federal Aviation Administration, Congress has required the agency to develop rules governing the operation of drones within U.S. National Airspace. Currently, the only barriers to operation of unmanned aircraft are procedural requirements that oblige drone operators to obtain operation certificates. The FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 requires the agency to conduct a public rule-making that will assess public safety concerns, licensing requirements, flight standards, and air traffic requirements. The FAA Secretary will also undertake safety studies and develop standards for "Safe Operation" in US airspace. However, the legislation does not consider the need to assess the privacy risks of the deployment of drones in US airspace. For more information, see EPIC: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Drones.

Department of Homeland Security Disregards Public Comments and Issues Final Rule that Undermines Traveler Privacy Rights

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection, a component within the Department of Homeland Security, issued a final rule approving Global Entry, a traveler screening program, despite the substantial privacy and security risks brought to the agency's attention. Under the Global Entry program, the CBP collects detailed personal information, including social security numbers and biometric information, that should be subject to Privacy Act safeguards. However, the agency rejected EPIC's recommendations that it comply with the Privacy Act by limiting the distribution of information to only those that need the information for screening purposes. In EPIC's comments, EPIC also noted that CBP violated federal law by not conducting a Privacy Impact Assessment before implementing the new Global Entry program. For more information, see: EPIC: Global Entry.

February 9, 2012

Federal Court Grants Accelerated Briefing Schedule in EPIC v. FTC

In response to EPIC's complaint and motion to compel the Federal Trade Commission to enforce a consent order against Google, a federal district court judge has ordered an accelerated briefing schedule. The FTC's Response to the EPIC briefs is due February 17, EPIC's reply is due February 21, 2012. The Court's deadlines reflect Google's imminent, substantial changes to the company's business practices. Google intends to consolidate the personal data of Google users across 60 services on March 1. EPIC contends that these changes constitute a violation of the consent order with the Federal Trade Commission. For more information, see EPIC v. FTC (Google Consent Order).

February 10, 2012

NIST Proposes Governance Structure for Internet Identity

The National Institute of Standards and Technology has released a report detailing the governance structure for the White House’s National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace. EPIC, joined by the Liberty Coalition, submitted comments on the original proposal, emphasizing the need for transparency and balanced representation. NIST adopted many of EPIC’s suggestions, including the establishment of a Privacy Coordination Committee. However, the final document ignored EPIC’s recommendation that legislation be enacted to safeguard privacy. For more information, see EPIC: National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace.

Google Report Raises New Questions About Compliance with Consent Order

The Google privacy compliance report, made public today, raises new questions about the company's failure to comply with an FTC Consent Order. The Order required Google to answer detailed questions about how it protects the personal information of Google users. But Google chose not to answer many of the questions. Most significantly, the company did not explain to the Commission the impact on user privacy of the proposed changes that will take place on March 1. EPIC has filed a lawsuit to force the Federal Trade Commission to require Google to comply with the Consent Order to protect the privacy interests of Google users. For more information, see EPIC v. FTC (Google Consent Order).

February 14, 2012

EPIC FOIA - New Details About Automated License Plate Readers Obtained

In response to an EPIC Freedom of Information Act request, Customs and Border Protection has disclosed nearly 1,000 pages of documents on automated license plate readers and border body scanners. The documents include contracts with several companies, such as Rapiscan and L3, for vehicle and cargo screening x-ray devices. Previous documents obtained by EPIC revealed that the agency is developing integrated vehicle scanners, with backscatter x-ray, Closed Circuit Television, and automated license plate readers, that would be used with human subjects. Radiation experts have questioned the safety of these systems, which produce ionizing radiation. For more information see EPIC FOIA: Automated License Plate Readers and Border Checkpoint Body Scanners.

February 15, 2012

EPIC Asks Congress to Suspend DHS Social Network Monitoring Program

In a Statement for the Record, EPIC has asked the House Committee on Homeland Security to suspend a DHS program that has permitted the agency to gather comments critical of the agency and the government by monitoring social networks and media organizations. The hearing on "DHS Monitoring of Social Networking and Media: Enhancing Intelligence Gathering and Ensuring Privacy" was called after EPIC obtained nearly 300 pages of documents detailing the Department of Homeland Security's activities. The documents, obtained as a result of EPIC's Freedom of Information Act lawsuit, include instructions from the DHS to General Dynamics to monitor media reports that "reflect adversely" on the agency or the federal government. For more information see: EPIC v. Department of Homeland Security: Media Monitoring.

February 16, 2012

FCC Issues Tougher RoboCall Rules

The Federal Communications Commission has issued new rules that strengthen consumer protections against telemarking calls. The rules require telemarketers to obtain written consent of consumers before placing a robocall, require telemarketers to allow consumers to revoke consent to a robocall during the call itself, and close a loophole that allowed telemarketers to place calls to customers with whom they had an established business relationship. EPIC was one of the consumer and privacy groups that advocated for the original Do Not Call registry. EPIC has also urged the FCC to require strong privacy safeguards for telephone customers' personal information, and protect wireless subscribers from telemarketing. For more information, see EPIC: EPIC Telemarketing and Telephone Consumer Protection Act.

FTC Report Shows Privacy Problems with Mobile Apps

The Federal Trade Commission issued a report today that found widespread failure among app stores and app developers to provide information to parents about the collection and use of children's data. The report noted that there are currently more than 500,000 apps in the Apple App Store and 380,000 in the Android Market, and that young children and teens are increasingly using smartphones for entertainment and educational purposes. The FTC report recommends that apps provide simple, short disclosures about their information collection and use practices, and that app stores assume greater role in providing information about the apps that they sell. EPIC previously submitted comments to the FTC on a proposed rule for the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act. For more information, see EPIC: Children's Online Privacy Protection Act and EPIC: Federal Trade Commission.

Congress Grills Department of Homeland Security

Members of a House Committee today questioned DHS officials about the agency's monitoring of social networks and media organizations for information that "reflects adversely" on the agency or the federal government. Several members expressed support for EPIC's proposal that DHS suspend the program, warning that this activity violates First Amendment rights. New questions also arose when the DHS witnesses claimed that no other federal agencies were engaged in similar practices. According to many news sources, the FBI wants to monitor social media. The House hearing was called after EPIC obtained nearly 300 pages of documents detailing the Department of Homeland Security's activities. For more information see: EPIC v. Department of Homeland Security: Media Monitoring.

February 17, 2012

EPIC to FTC: Enforce the Google Consent Order

Today EPIC wrote to the Federal Trade Commission urging it to enforce the consent order with Google in light of a recent Wall Street Journal article based on research from Stanford's Jonathan Mayer that described how Google had been circumventing the privacy settings of Safari users despite Google's promise to respect such settings. EPIC said that Google "took elaborate measures to circumvent the Safari privacy safeguards, and it benefited from the misrepresentations by the commercial value it surreptitiously obtained." EPIC has filed a lawsuit to force the FTC to require Google to comply with the Consent Order to protect the privacy interests of Google users. The FTC's Response to the EPIC motion is due February 17; EPIC's reply is due February 21, 2012. For more information, see EPIC: EPIC v. FTC (Google Consent Order).

"FOIA Matters" - EPIC Obtains Google Privacy Compliance Report

As the result of a Freedom of Information Act request to the Federal Trade Commission, EPIC has obtained a full copy of Google's first Privacy Compliance Report. Last year, spurred by a complaint pursued by EPIC, the FTC reached a settlement with Google and required the company to file regular reports with the Commission detailing its steps to comply with the Consent order. However, the report obtained by EPIC raises new questions about the company's efforts to safeguard user privacy. EPIC has recently filed a lawsuit against the FTC to compel the agency to enforce the Consent Order. For more information see: EPIC: EPIC v. FTC (Google Consent Order) and EPIC: In re Google Buzz.

"New Concerns Over Online Privacy"

"New Concerns Over Online Privacy"

Marc Rotenberg,
EPIC Executive Director

The Diane Rehm Show
National Public Radio
WAMU (DC)
February 20, 2012

FTC Files Opposition / Motion to Dismiss in EPIC v FTC

The Federal Trade Commission today filed an opposition and a motion to dismiss in response to EPIC's complaint to compel the agency to enforce the October 2011 Consent Order against Google. The government stated that EPIC would "deprive the Commission of the discretion to exercise its enforcement authority." The government also charged that EPIC's lawsuit is "completely baseless." The papers were filed in federal District Court on the same day that the Wall Street Journal reported that Google had subverted the privacy settings of millions of users of the Internet browser software Safari. For more information see: EPIC: EPIC v. FTC (Google Consent Order).

February 20, 2012

2013 Federal Budget Limits Body Scanners, But Expands Domestic Surveillance

According to White House budget documents and the Congressional Testimony of Secretary Napolitano, DHS will not purchase any new airport body scanners in 2013. However, the agency will expand a wide range of programs for monitoring and tracking individuals within the United States. This includes the development of biometric identification techniques for programs such as Secure Communities. DHS will also seek funding for "Einstein 3," a network intrusion detection program that enables surveillance of private networks. EPIC has urged the DHS to comply with the requirements of the federal Privacy Act, and is currently pursuing several Freedom of Information Act lawsuits against the agency. For more information see, EPIC - Body Scanners and Radiation Risks, EPIC - E-Verify, EPIC - Secure Communities, EPIC - Fusion Centers, EPIC - Drones, EPIC - Cybersecurity, EPIC - Secure Flight.

February 21, 2012

EPIC Urges Federal Court To Hold FTC Accountable for Failure to Enforce Google Consent Order

In a reply brief filed today in Washington, DC, EPIC said that the Federal Trade Commission's failure to enforce the Consent Order against Google prior to March 1 would cause "irreparable injury." EPIC cited Google's plans to combine user data without consent, and pointed to numerous cases that establish the need for the Court to assess the FTC's failure to act. Dismissing arguments asserted by the government that "FTC enforcement decisions are not subject to judicial review," EPIC said that Congress has clearly told the Federal Trade Commission to enforce its final orders. And in response to a claim that EPIC's request for action by March 1 is "arbitrary," EPIC wrote "If the government is unaware that Google plans to make a substantial change in its business practices on March 1, 2012, it should turn on a computer connected to the Internet." For more information, see EPIC, EPIC v. FTC (Google Consent Order).

February 22, 2012

Support EPIC's Petition: Tell the FAA to Begin a Rulemaking on Drones and Privacy

The Federal Aviation Administration is about to begin a public rulemaking on public safety related to drone use. EPIC would like the FAA to also undertake a rulemaking on privacy. The use of drones in US airspace poses a real threat to important privacy interests, and the Agency has the authority to regulate the use of drones. If you would like to sign EPIC's petition, please send an e-mail with the subject line "I support the EPIC Drone Privacy Petition to the FAA," your full name, and email address or twitter handle to [email protected]. Your name will be added as a signatory. All emails must be received by midnight on Friday, February 24, 2012. For more information, see EPIC: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Drones.

State Attorneys General Cite Privacy Risks to Android Users, Demand Meeting with Google

Attorneys general from 36 states and territories sent a letter to Google raising new questions about the plan to consolidate user data on March 1. "The new policy forces consumers to allow information across all of these products to be shared, without giving them the ability to opt out.," the letter says. The state AGs also say "this invasion of privacy is virtually impossible to escape for the nation's Android-powered smartphone users, who comprise nearly 50% of the national smartphone market. For these consumers, avoiding Google's privacy policy change may mean buying an entirely new phone at great personal expense." The AGs point out that Google told Android users "We will not reduce your rights under this Privacy Policy without your explicit consent." Last week, EPIC filed a lawsuit to force the Federal Trade Commission to require Google to honor its previous commitments to Google users. EPIC has alleged that the proposed changes in the company's practices violate a 2011 Consent Order. For more information, see EPIC: EPIC v. FTC (Google Consent Order).

February 23, 2012

EPIC Obtains New Documents on DHS Media Monitoring, Urges Congress to Suspend Program

EPIC has submitted a letter to Congress following a hearing on DHS monitoring of social networks and media organizations. In the letter, EPIC highlights new documents obtained as a result of a FOIA lawsuit and points out to inconsistencies in DHS' testimony about the program. Though DHS testified that it does not monitor for public reaction to government proposals, the documents obtained by EPIC indicate that the DHS analysts are specifically instructed to look for criticism of the agency and then to redirect reports that would otherwise be circulated to other agencies. EPIC wrote that the DHS' monitoring program should be suspended, as it exceeds the agency's statutory authority and chills First Amendment activity. For more information, see EPIC: EPIC v. DHS: Media Monitoring.

White House Sets Out Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights

The Obama Administration put forward a comprehensive privacy framework with principles designed to establish new safeguards for consumers and new responsibilities for companies that collect and use personal information. The principles include (1) individual control over the collection and use of personal data; (2) transparency; (3) respect for the context in which data is collected; (4) security; (5) access and correction rights for consumers; (6) data limitation; and (7) accountability. President Obama stated that "even though we live in a world in which we share personal information more freely than in the past, we must reject the conclusion that privacy is an outmoded value. It has been at the heart of our democracy from its inception, and we need it now more than ever." EPIC praised the framework and the President's support for privacy, and said that the challenge ahead would be implementation and enforcement. For more information, see EPIC: Commerce Department and EPIC: Federal Trade Commission, and EPIC: White House - Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights.

February 24, 2012

Judge Rules that Courts Lacks Jurisdiction over FTC, Acknowledges "Serious Concerns" with Google Privacy Changes

A federal court today dismissed EPIC's lawsuit against the FTC, because the "decision to enforce the Consent Order is committed to agency discretion and is not subject to judicial review." However, the Judge also said "the Court has not reached the question of whether the new policies would violate the consent order or if they would be contrary to any other legal requirements." And she said "the FTC, which has advised the Court that the matter is under review, may ultimately decide to institute an enforcement action." EPIC will appeal the decision on judicial review, asking the DC federal appeals court to rule that courts can require federal agencies to enforce final orders. For more, see EPIC: EPIC v. FTC (Google Consent Order).

Privacy Groups to Rep. Bono-Mack: "Hold *Public* Hearings on Google Privacy Changes"

Five privacy organizations, including EPIC, wrote today to Rep. Bono-Mack to urge the Chairwoman of a powerful Congressional committee to hold a public hearing on Google's proposed changes in business practices that will take effect March 1. Rep. Bono-Mack has held closed-door meetings with the Internet giant, but so far has scheduled no public hearings on the plan to consolidate user data, which EPIC alleges violates a 2011 Consent Order with the Federal Trade Commission. The consumer groups also asked the Congresswoman to urge Google to suspend its plan pending an investigation. They said there would be "overwhelming public support for this action" and cited recent statements from Members of Congress, Attorneys General, European Justice Officials, the President, technical experts, and IT managers in government and the private sector. For more information see EPIC: EPIC v. FTC.

EPIC Petition Demands that FAA Protect Privacy and Regulate Drones

EPIC, joined by more than 100 organizations, experts, and members of the public, has sent a petition to the Federal Aviation Administration, urging the agency to address the privacy threats associated with the increased use of drones in the United States. Congress recently passed legislation requiring the Agency to assess the safety of drones used by commercial and government operators. The petition asserts that "The privacy threat posed by the deployment of drone aircraft in the United States is great. The public should be given the opportunity to comment on this development." For more information, see EPIC: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Drones.

February 27, 2012

EPIC Appeals Court Ruling in Google Privacy Case

Within hours after a federal court in Washington, DC ruled that it could not require the Federal Trade Commission to enforce a consent order against Google, EPIC filed an emergency appeal with the Court Appeals for the DC Circuit. EPIC has asked the appellate court to overturn the lower court decision before March 1, when Google will change its terms of service and consolidate user data without consent. For more information, see EPIC - EPIC v. FTC (Google Consent Order).

Pew Study: Social Media Users Active in Protecting Privacy

A Pew study found that users are becoming more active in managing their social media accounts. Compared to 2009, a higher percentage of users reported deleting people from their “friends” lists, deleting comments made by others on their profile, and removing their names from photos in which they were tagged. The report also found that women and young users were the most active in protecting their privacy. The Federal Trade Commission is currently finalizing a consent order with Facebook over charges that the company changed users' privacy settings to make personal information more available to the public and to Facebook's business partners. For more information, see EPIC: Social Networking Privacy, EPIC: Facebook Privacy, and EPIC: Public Opinion and Privacy.

February 28, 2012

FTC Chairman: Google Users Face a "brutal choice" -- Europeans: "Google's new policy does not meet the requirements of the European Directive on Data Protection."

Pressure is building as the March 1 deadline for Google's planned changes in user privacy approaches. In an interview with C-Span, the Chairman of the Federal Trade Commission said that users of Google services face a "brutal" choice." The head of the French Data Protection Agency, on behalf of European privacy agencies, has warned that Google's proposed change violates European Union privacy law. She is reiterated the recommendation of Europe's Justice Minister that Google suspend the change. In Washington, DC, EPIC has filed an emergency appeal with the DC Circuit Court of Appeals to force the FTC to enforce the 2011 consent order against Google. For more information, see EPIC v. FTC (Google Consent Order).

Virginia Senate Narrowly Approves Voter ID Law

The Virginia Senate passed a controversial voter photo ID law by one vote. The bill now goes to the Virginia House for consideration. Voter ID laws implicate the privacy rights rights of voters and also discourage voter turnout particularly among poorer voters who may not have necessary credentials, such as a drivers license. In 2007, EPIC challenged the Indiana voter photo ID law. For more information, see EPIC: Voting Privacy and EPIC: Crawford v. Marion County.

February 29, 2012

EU and US Consumer Groups to Google: "This plan is a mistake"

The Transatlantic Consumer Dialogue, a coalition of leading consumer organizations in North America and Europe, today urged Google CEO Larry Page to drop the plan to combine user data on March 1. Citing the pending changes to Google's terms of service, the groups said "It is both unfair and unwise for you to 'change the terms of the bargain' as you propose to do." TACD said "consumers have relied on your policies and your terms of service in choosing your products." Late Friday, EPIC filed an emergency appeal with the DC Circuit of Appeals in an attempt to force the Federal Trade Commission to take action prior to March 1. For more information, see EPIC: EPIC v. FTC (Google Consent Order).

Identity Theft Remains Top Concern of US Consumers

According to the Federal Trade Commission, identity theft was the top source of consumer complaints in 2011 comprising 15 percent of the 1.8 million total complaints filed. This is the 12th year in a row in which identity theft has occupied the top position. The report contains data on 30 complaint categories, which are broken down by metropolitan areas and provided to state and local law enforcement offices. For more information, see EPIC: FTC and EPIC: Identity Theft.

Senators Seek Study on Voter ID Laws

A group of U.S. senators have asked the Government Accountability Office to study the “alarming number” of new state laws that will make it “significantly harder” for millions of eligible voters to cast ballots this November. New state identification laws, by one estimate, will have a direct impact on 21 million American citizens who do not have a government-issued photo ID. The majority of those people are young would-be voters, the elderly, African Americans, Hispanics, and those earning $35,000 per year or less. For more information, see EPIC: Voting Privacy and Voter Photo ID and Privacy.

EPIC Sues to Block Changes to Education Privacy Rules

EPIC has filed a lawsuit under the Administrative Procedure Act against the Department of Education. EPIC's lawsuit argues that the agency's December 2011 regulations amending the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act exceed the agency's statutory authority, and are contrary to law. In 2011, the Education Department requested public comments regarding the proposed changes. In response, EPIC submitted extensive comments, addressing the student privacy risks and the agency's lack of legal authority to make changes to the privacy law without explicit Congressional intent. The agency issued the revised regulations despite the fact that "numerous commenters . . . believe the Department lacks the statutory authority to promulgate the proposed regulations." EPIC is joined in the lawsuit by co-plaintiffs Grayson Barber, Pablo Molina, Peter G. Neumman, and Dr. Deborah Peel. The case is EPIC v. US Department of Education, No. 12-00327. For more information, see EPIC: Student Privacy.

EPIC Urges Court to Uphold Location Privacy in Cell Phone Tracking Case

EPIC filed a "friend of the court" brief in the New Jersey Supreme Court urging the court to uphold Fourth Amendment protections for cell phone users. In State of New Jersey v. Thomas W. Earls, the lower court held that an individual has no legitimate expectation of privacy in the location of their cell phone. EPIC argued that the lower court opinion should be overturned in light of the Supreme Court's recent decision in United States v. Jones. The cell phone tracking techniques in this case, EPIC argued, "is more invasive than the GPS tracking in Jones." For more information, see EPIC: State v. Earls, and EPIC: US v. Jones.

About February 2012

This page contains all entries posted to epic.org in February 2012. They are listed from oldest to newest.

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